Children are clearly not little grown ups. Anatomically they are really different. One of them differences is there are growing locations within bones the spot that the growth of the bone takes place from. Since the bones have got these types of growing zones, injuries to those growth regions can happen. Among the more well-known of those strains is one that is known as Severs disease that impacts the rear part of the calcaneus bone in the feet. The most frequent source of this disorder is usually too much use. Whenever running or walking the growing section of the heel bone is the first to contact the floor and this puts lots of strain on that portion of the heel and can make it liable to damage. The standard indications of Severs disease is soreness on activity at the back of the heel bone and discomfort on squeezing the sides of the calcaneus bone. It can be particularly sore during and immediatly after exercise. This is more common in the early teenage years. By the later teenage years, the growing region no longer is there so it will be impossible to get this disorder then.

Because the growing area of the bone vanishes entirely as the child ages, this condition is self-limiting and will also be grown out of. Treatment methods when it is painful is aimed at alleviating the symptoms whilst waiting for the growth to take its course. Generally just describing the self-limiting aspect of the Severs disease as well as minimizing activity levels is enough to assist this issue. Ordinarily a soft cushioned heel pad may be used inside the footwear that will help with the signs and symptoms. Ice packs used on the spot after sport activity can deal with the more painful attacks. When these measures don't settle symptoms down sufficiently, then a more severe decrease in activity and sports activities levels may be required. In the most difficult instances, a immobilizing support may need to be used to really minimize exercise.